Podcast finds humor in adulthood

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Author: Will Westwater

Out of all the media I consume, the most consistently enjoyable production has to be “The Comedy Button” podcast. Unscripted, hilarious, and definitely not safe for work, the podcast has molded my overall outlook on comedy in daily life.

The show consists of conversations between co-hosts Brian Altano, Scott Bromley, Anthony Gallegos, Max Scoville and Ryan Scott. The five are connected by their ties to video gaming, as all worked in the industry at some point in their lives. Still, the conversation extends far beyond this common thread. The group meets weekly to discuss everything from current events to sex, nerd culture and pop culture. Additionally, the show has no scripts and no planned bits. “The Comedy Button” thrives on the comedic day-to-day lives of ’80s kids living their adult lives.

In an interview, Scoville calls the podcast a “long-form coming-of-age in real time” and likened the group’s maturity to that of “kidults.” The show is refreshingly honest and strangely optimistic in its unique take on adulthood.

“We are by-products of Nicktoons, ‘Beavis and Butthead’ and ’80s action cartoons,” Scoville said. “A lot of really weird, kind of loud, stupid stuff that didn’t exactly prepare us for real life, and here we are in real life and realizing that it’s still okay.”

Listeners can see the effects of “real life” on the hosts over the course of the show’s four years. Several of them have become engaged and one married, and most of them now live what some may call a tamer life, trading stories of debauchery for those of IKEA trips and double-paned windows. However, even as the hosts age, the show remains a top-tier podcast. They still have adventures every week, like when Altano broke up with his gym or Bromley recounted his Airbnb nightmare weekend.

In essence, “The Comedy Button” is five best friends on record. As a ’90s kid and a junior in college, I know that I will be right where they are soon. It is comforting to see everything work for them. Through break-ups, unemployment, successes and failures, the five hosts always come together laughing.

The hosts’ willingness to tell their lives in weekly installments is a gift. I recommend every episode of “The Comedy Button,” although the two best of” episodes, collecting the greatest moments across the show’s history, are a good place to start. Episodes air every Friday and can be found on iTunes, YouTube and SoundCloud.

Give the “The Comedy Button” a listen. Behind its “kidult” antics and offensive language is a group of people who stick together to bring out the funny side of life. It is a reminder that adult life is best lived open and honest, with a couple of great friends.

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